1-18: Most Americans Continue to Struggle

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece.]

Paul Buchheit has a book coming out in March. If you want to purchase Disposable Americans: Extreme Capitalism and the Case for a Guaranteed Income (Critical Interventions), however, you may also want to save up first—hardcover retails at $119, paperback goes for $37.95. The author blogged yesterday what might be considered a tantalizing preview with disturbing and discouraging statistics from the year that was.

“How American Life Continued to Deteriorate in 2016”

But, that cannot be, one might argue. We are the greatest nation on earth, after all, the greatest that ever was, for goodness’ sakes.

The reality of the disposable American has been building up in recent years, and new evidence keeps pouring in. Now the potential exists for greater suffering under the rule of a billionaire Cabinet that is far, far removed from average workers and renters and homeowners.

First the “Upside” — 5% of Us Are Millionaires

Small consolation.

Depending on the source, America has anywhere from 7 million to 13.5 million millionaires — about 5% of U.S. adults, and about a 40% increase in just six years. At the other end, 90% of us have gained NOTHING since 1997, and at least half of us NOTHING since 1980.

New Evidence of an Overall Collapse

Recent studies show America at or near the bottom among developed countries in disposable income, poverty, income and wealth inequality, safety net provisions, employment, economic mobility, life expectancy, infant mortality, and the well-being of children. We’ve run the table. The better part of America is equivalent to a third-world country.

Impossible!

Neglecting the Most Vulnerable among Us

We have fallen far as a nation when a half-million of our children under the age of four are taking anxiety drugs, and when the great majority of American families have to spend over 10% of their income just to send their four-year-olds to pre-school. And the “American Dream” for our kids? According to one careful study, they only have about half the chance that they had fifty years ago.

So much for my generation paving the way for a better place for our progeny.

Racist Gap-Widening

Today just 100 individuals own as much wealth as the entire Black population of America.

You might want to read that sentence again to have it sink in.

Even a middle-aged African-American with a graduate degree has only about the same odds of becoming a millionaire as a white person with a high school diploma. The common misperception is that Black youths turn to drugs at a disproportionate rate. Not true. According to the American Journal of Public Health, “drug-use disorders were most prevalent among non-Hispanic Whites, followed by Hispanics, then African Americans.” Yet “racial/ethnic minorities are disproportionately incarcerated, especially for drug crimes.”

Finding a Stable Job is Becoming Impossible for Much of America

We keep hearing about the drop in the unemployment rate. But with nearly two out of every five American adults not even in the labor force,  the unemployment rate is more like 30%. Partly explaining our employment frustration is a Princeton study which concluded that only 6% of the ten million new jobs created in the past decade were traditional full-time positions, while 94% of them were temporary or contract-based.

How do those workers obtain insurance?

Americans: Sick and Dying, and Killing Themselves

Harvard researcher Dr. Samuel Dickman said, “We spend more on medical care than in any other country, and those dollars are increasingly concentrated on the wealthy.” Less fortunate Americans are 15 pounds heavier than in the 1990s, dying from alcoholism at a record rate, and struggling with mental health problems for which treatment facilities have been continually cut, leaving many mentally ill people in jails rather than in psychiatric hospitals.

The Unkindest Cut of All:

Finally, most disturbingly, we’re living in an era of suicide in America, in parallel with our era of inequality. Suicide is at its highest level in 30 years. It’s especially high for veterans. War is traumatic and depressing, but so is a return to a deteriorating nation.

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.

1-11: Gun Crazy Florida

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece from Democracy Now.]

What are they thinking?

Democracy Now ran this story yesterday:

Florida Prepares to Expand Gun Rights after Second Mass Shooting in Six Months

Accused airport gunman Esteban Santiago could face the death penalty for charges that he killed five people when he opened fire in a crowded Florida baggage claim terminal. Friday’s shooting came as Florida lawmakers were preparing to consider legislation to loosen prohibitions on firearms by eliminating some of the state’s “gun-free zones,” which currently include airport terminals.

In a 2015 on-air interview Amy Goodman spoke with Florida senator Greg Steube. His remarks are mind-blowing.

Amy Goodman: I wanted to turn Republican Florida Senator Greg Steube, who sponsored Senate Bill 140, which would repeal a gun ban on college campuses, airport terminals and at government meetings. This is Steube talking on The Gun Writer TV in 2015.

Sen. Greg Steube: I think that law-abiding citizens should have the right to defend themselves. And I don’t think that right should stop just because you’re walking onto a college campus. We can carry in businesses. We can carry at shopping plazas. We can carry at malls. We can carry at restaurants. But because there’s some law that says we can’t carry on college campuses, to me, that doesn’t make a lot of sense. So, I think that people, especially young female students or people that are military veterans who now are using the GI Bill to go to school, of anybody, they should have the right to be able to defend themselves and others. And we have seen, time and time again, that terrorists and people with mental illnesses use places where they know that people aren’t carrying to target.

You might add, Senator, that innocent people, gun carrying or not, can also be carried out of businesses, shopping plazas, malls, and restaurants. And too often they are.

I have just finished reading Ron Chernow’s 1,000+ page biography of Alexander Hamilton. Spoiler alert: Hamilton dies in a duel at the hands of sitting vice president Aaron Burr. Although the gentlemanly sport had been outlawed, Burr was never sent to trial and in fact took his seat as presider over the Senate a few days after the incident.

We have learned nothing. Burr’s shot did nothing for his honor except destroy it. Santiago’s shots merely reinforce the banality humankind is capable of. I would like to think we are better than that. I don’t. Prove me wrong.

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top corner is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.

1-9: Homeless, Not Anonymous

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece from VA.gov.]

Veteran Homelessness

Over the last five years, we have witnessed how critical partnerships and evidence-based strategies are to solving complex social problems like Veteran homelessness.

Thanks to our collective efforts with partner organizations and strategies informed by data, there has been a 47 percent reduction in Veteran homelessness across the United States since 2010. There has been a 17 percent decrease between 2015 and 2016 — four times the previous year’s decline.

These unprecedented accomplishments show that the policies we developed and implemented with guidance from community partners and experts in academia and VA’s National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans are working. Today, there is nearly universal agreement that communities across the United States can build the infrastructure — in partnership with VA and other organizations —to ensure that every Veteran who becomes homeless can be rapidly connected to stable housing.

In fact, three states — Connecticut, Delaware and Virginia — and more than 30 communities have done just that, effectively ending homelessness among Veterans by identifying homeless Veterans by name and putting them on the pathway to rapidly securing permanent housing. Each of those communities also has a system in place to help newly homeless and at-risk Veterans become or remain stably housed with assistance from VA, VA’s grantees or other organizations.

We’re not yet there in every community, though, so our job is not done. As a result, I recently charged all VA staff and partners to undertake a surge in each community to house as many homeless Veterans as possible over the next 30 days.  I encourage every VA employee, partner organization and community supporter to join us by redoubling your efforts to help Veterans exit homelessness immediately.

Whether you are a VA employee, local homeless service provider, VA grantee or public housing authority, we are calling on you to be part of the solution. Especially during this critically important time of year, when temperatures in many parts of the country can plunge to dangerous lows, you can help us accelerate our efforts to help Veterans in need secure permanent housing through these targeted strategies.

  • Increase permanent housing placements. We can increase the number of Veterans moving from the streets into permanent housing over the next 30 days by:
    • Fully utilizing all project-based housing units for Veterans, such as those available through Department of Housing and Urban Development and Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) vouchers.
    • Increasing the rate of permanent housing placements from VA’s Health Care for Homeless Veterans contract residential services and Grant and Per Diem programs.
    • Maximizing the rate of rapid-rehousing in the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program.
  • Provide the right services at the right time. We can prioritize unsheltered Veterans for immediate placement into safe housing by:
    • Ensuring that those who enter community homeless response systems require that level of assistance.
    • Ensuring that Veterans are appropriately targeted for the HUD-VASH program.
    • Reserving VA’s homeless Veteran residential services for only those Veterans who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless.
  • Maximize VA resources. We can ensure staff and bed resources are available to help make the 30-day surge successful by:
    • Ensuring full utilization of homeless Veteran residential program beds by Veterans who need them.
    • Ramping up VA and volunteer staff to support the effort.
  • Engage with your community. Partnerships are critical to continued success. We can all:

Join your local HUD continuum of care in enumerating homeless persons during the upcoming point-in-time Count and ensuring that homeless Veterans are accurately identified and rapidly housed. I encourage all VA staff and partners to support and participate in this important 30-day surge effort to help as many Veterans as possible exit homelessness.

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.

1-5: The Cost of News

[I write about politics because of the direct link I see between the words and actions of politicians and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. America’s political class manipulates our military as though they were pawns in a global game of chess. To them, PTSD is merely an unfortunate cost of war.]

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece from blogger RetIII.]

Blogger RetIII opens with the headline sentence,

The root cause of TV journalism’s problem is not hard to understand.

 

Even the casual news consumer will recognize most, if not all, of the names bulleted below. Their salaries are impressive. Are they worth the money they are paid?

  • Chris Wallace — $1 million
  • Scott Pelley – $5 Million.
  • Chris Mathews — $5 million
  • Megyn Kelly – $6 Million (and increasing soon)
  • Rachel Maddow – $7 Million.
  • Shepard Smith – $7-$8 Million.
  • Anderson Cooper – $11 Million.
  • Diane Sawyer – $12 Million.
  • George Stephanopoulos — $15 million
  • Bill O’Reilly – $20 Million.
  • Matt Lauer – $25 Million.

RetIII notes: “We have hit a point where the prominent journalists are part of the story themselves.” Unfortunately, journalists in general are poorly paid (with relation to the hours they work) and print journalism in the form of daily newspapers is becoming a lost art. In checking backgrounds of each of these familiar faces, I’m pretty sure—in my fantasy world as TV news producer—I would find a spot for them on my team. Just not sure I would pay their rates.

Chris Wallace

Although being the son of hard-hitting reporter Mike Wallace probably didn’t hurt, Wallace began his news career at the Boston Globe.

Scott Pelley

Pelley, the only non-college grad of the group, began as a copyboy at a local newspaper then worked his way up the ladder via a series of positions at local TV stations in Texas.

Chris Mathews

After joining the Peace Corps rather than risk being drafted during the Vietnam War Era, Matthews landed a position on the Capitol Hill Police Force. He wrote speeches for Jimmy Carter, was an aide to Tip O’Neill, and wrote a political column for the San Francisco Chronicle.

Megyn Kelly

Kelly began her professional life as a lawyer. A prime time figure at Fox News, Kelly will soon transfer to another high profile position at NBC News.

Rachel Maddow

Maddow graduated from Stanford University before moving on to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. There she earned a Ph.D. in political science.

Shepard Smith

Smith earned his degree in journalism at the University of Mississippi.

Anderson Cooper

The son of Gloria Vanderbilt, Cooper earned his degree in political science at Yale.

Diane Sawyer

Having earned her BA in English from Wellesley College, Sawyer went on to work as a staffer for President Richard Nixon.

George Stephanopoulos

In addition to his degree in political science from Columbia, interesting fact: Stephanopoulos has a masters degree in theology from Oxford.

Bill O’Reilly

O’Reilly worked at a number of local TV stations around the country before attaining his masters in broadcast journalism at Boston University.

Matt Lauer

Lauer graduated from Ohio University with a degree in communication.

They sure make a bundle of money, but it is hard to argue that they didn’t prepare for their chosen career path.

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.

12-19: Does the South China Sea Belong to China?

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece from the Associated Press’s Christopher Bodeen, “Report: Beijing Adds Weapons to South China Sea Islands.”]

China Building Bases in South China Sea … Why?

According to AP’s Christopher Bodeen,

China appears to have installed anti-aircraft and anti-missile weapons on its man-made islands in the strategically vital South China Sea … upping the stakes in what many see as a potential Asian powder keg.

Do you think? The question, of course, is why. Why does behemoth China feel it necessary to bolster their coastal defenses?

The Center for Strategic and International Studies said in a report … that the anti-aircraft guns and close-in weapons systems designed to guard against missile attack have been placed on all seven of China’s newly created islands.

What country would be foolish enough to fire missiles at China, and for what purpose?

The outposts were built in recent years over objections by the U.S. and rival claimants by piling sand on top of coral reefs, followed by the construction of military grade 3,000-meter (10,000-foot) airstrips, barracks, lighthouses, radar stations and other infrastructure.

“… over objections by the U.S. and rival claimants …” How is the U.S. threatened by the existence of these bases? More to the point, I guess, is what U.S. interests are threatened? And, digging deeper, what are U.S. interests in and around the South China Sea?

Appropriate and Legal

In a statement, China’s Defense Ministry [said] that development on the islands was mainly for civilian purposes, but added that defensive measures were “appropriate and legal.”

“For example, were someone to be threatening you with armed force outside your front door, would you not get ready even a slingshot?” the ministry statement said.

Point taken. But who poses such a threat?

Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters at a daily briefing that he had no information about the reported weaponry, but said such deployments were China’s sovereign right.

The Philippines, which has troops and villagers stationed on some reefs and islands near China’s new artificial islands, expressed concern despite recently improving relations with China.

“If true, it is a big concern for us and the international community who uses the South China Sea lanes for trade,” Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said. “It would mean that the Chinese are militarizing the area, which is not good.”

China’s new island armaments “show that Beijing is serious about defense of its artificial islands in case of an armed contingency in the South China Sea,” Center for Strategic and International Studies experts wrote in the report.

Now I get it.

“Among other things, they would be the last line of defense against cruise missiles launched by the United States or others against these soon-to-be-operational air bases,” the report said.

Beijing says the islands are intended to boost maritime safety in the region while downplaying their military utility. They also mark China’s claim to ownership of practically the entire South China Sea.

Dollars, Dollars, Dollars

It hardly seems plausible that America would attack such an important trade partner and debt holder as China.

Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei also claim territory in the waterway through which an estimated $5 trillion in global trade passes each year, while the U.S. Navy insists on its right to operate throughout the area, including in waters close to China’s new outposts. China has strongly criticized such missions, known as freedom of navigation operations….

Chinese President Xi Jinping said on a visit to the U.S. last year that “China does not intend to pursue militarization” of the area … Despite that, China considers it vital to equip the islands with defensive means given their distance — 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) — from the Chinese mainland, together with the nearby presence of forces from rival claimants such as Vietnam, said Yue Gang, a retired colonel and military analyst.

“As the matter of fact, these occupied islands have been armed and fortified for a long time,” Yue said. “No country in the world would only commit to providing civil services without considering its own security safety.”

Looking forward, the nature of China’s new military deployments will likely be calibrated in response to moves taken by the U.S., said the IISS’s Neill.

In or Out?

How do we Americans find ourselves so deeply involved in affairs such as this? Perhaps the answer lies somewhere in the U.S. Navy’s insistence “on its right to operate throughout the area.” Since WWII, we have established and expanded our military presence in Southeast Asia. After using weapons of mass destruction (the “bomb”) on Hiroshima and Nagasake, we wrote the Japanese Constitution which forbade that nation from rebuilding its military. We, the U.S.A. would instead impose our military in Japan in perpetuity.

Then came the Korean War. More troops, more need for permanent bases in South Korea. Then Vietnam. Air and naval bases in the Philippines. War. War. More war. How appalling it is that we commit our military so liberally and interminably. When it comes to war zones, we’re in.

The question we need to demand our leaders to answer is: How do we get out?

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top corner is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.

12-9: CNN Heroes of 2016

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece which comes from cnn.com.]

This is unabashedly a feel good piece, compiled by CNN’s Drew Kann. The network will air “CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute” Sunday, December 11 at 8 pm ET.

Meet the top 10 CNN Heroes of 2016

Jeison Aristizábal

Growing up with cerebral palsy in Colombia, a doctor once told Jeison Aristizábal’s mother that he would “amount to nothing.” Aristizábal has since started law school and dedicated his life to helping others reach their full potential.

His nonprofit, ASODISVALLE, offers young people with disabilities a range of free services, including medical care, physical therapy and healthy meals.

“The most special thing about the foundation is the love and care that we give to the children,” Aristizábal said. “We fight for their happiness.

Craig Dodson

Craig Dodson was a semi-professional cyclist in 2005 when he was asked to speak to a group of students in Richmond, Virginia. He later learned that many in the crowd lived in one of the city’s roughest housing projects.

Inspired to help, Dodson founded the Richmond Cycling Corps in 2010, a nonprofit that coaches cycling teams for at-risk children. For Dodson, cycling is a way into their lives and a path out of the projects.

“We are like the Navy SEALs,” Dodson said. “We have to infiltrate and be there for every part of their life.”

Sherri Franklin

Sherri Franklin poured her lifelong passion for animals into volunteer work at the San Francisco humane society. Sadly, she noticed older dogs were being passed over in favor of the shelter’s puppies.

To save them, Franklin started Muttville out of her home, a nonprofit that rescues and finds homes for senior dogs — more than 4,000 so far.

“It is not about the quantity of time, it really is about the quality of time you spend with your animal,” Franklin said.

Brad Ludden

At age 18, Brad Ludden had already completed nearly 100 “first descents” — kayak trips down a section of river no one has paddled before. After watching his aunt battle cancer when she was 38, Ludden started First Descents, a nonprofit that brings these once-in-a-lifetime experiences to young adults battling the disease — with more than 3,000 participants to date.

“It’s that important reminder that this life, it’s really fleeting,” Ludden said. “With that knowledge, we have this obligation to go out and live as fully as possible.”

Luma Mufleh

Luma Mufleh founded a soccer program and school through her organization, the Fugees Family, to address the unique needs of the refugee community in Clarkston, Georgia. Last spring, the Fugees Academy graduated its first class, and Mufleh’s group has helped more than 800 refugee children.

“It’s getting people from all over the world, from all different faiths, to come together to do something great,” Mufleh said.

Umra Omar

Umra Omar left a career in the United States to help people without any access to health care in her homeland of Kenya. Omar founded Safari Doctors, a group that travels by boat, road and air to bring free medical services to more than 1,000 people a year in remote and insecure areas near the Somalia border.

“Being here, being close to home, to be able to fill some of the gaps in accessing health care, it’s kind of been an IV drip for life and purpose,” Omar said.

Georgie Smith

Los Angeles County has the country’s largest foster youth population, and when they age out of the system, they’re often left on their own.

After seeing this first-hand, designer and chef Georgie Smith founded the nonprofit A Sense of Home, which provides comfortable living spaces for former foster youth.

“By setting up their first home, it gives them the foundation from which they can succeed,” Smith said.

Sheldon Smith

Like nearly half of all African-American children in the U.S., Sheldon Smith grew up with an absentee father. Serving prison time for robbery scared Smith straight and inspired him to stay in his child’s life and encourage others to do the same.

Smith started the Dovetail Project, which teaches young fathers the life skills necessary to become responsible parents and positive role models.

“My goal when I started the Dovetail Project was to break the cycle,” Smith said.

Becca Stevens

Nearly twenty years ago, Becca Stevens, an episcopal priest, set out to help the women of Nashville who have been scarred by prostitution, addiction and trafficking.

Today, her nonprofit, Thistle Farms, runs five residential communities in Nashville, providing women a place to stay for two years, medical care, counseling and other services — all for free.

“None of the women ended up on the streets by themselves. And so it makes sense that it takes a community to welcome them home,” Stevens said.

Harry Swimmer

An encounter with a girl named Stacy changed Harry Swimmer’s life. Stacy has cerebral palsy, and meeting her gave Swimmer an idea: What would happen if he put Stacy on a horse? “[S]he just lit up like a candle.”

Soon after, Swimmer retired and transformed his horse farm into a sanctuary for children with disabilities. Since 1988, his organization, Mitey Riders, has provided more than 800 children with free equine-assisted therapy.

VisitCNNHeroes.com.

 

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top corner is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.

 

 

12-5: I Report, You Decide; Carrier/United Technologies

[I write about politics because of the direct link I see between the words and actions of politicians and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. America’s political class manipulates our military as though they were pawns in a global game of chess. To them, PTSD is merely an unfortunate cost of war.]

[I consult and consider many sources in search of appropriate subject matter for this blog. Often I find material that is best left (mostly) untouched by me, e.g., today’s piece excerpted from Bernie Sanders.]

Sanders’ title:

Carrier Just Showed Corporations How to Beat Donald Trump

This is but a single paragraph from an essay Bernie Sanders published last week on Carrier and its parent, United Technologies. I have bulleted the quantified items for purposes of emphasis and digestibility.

It is not my intent to disparage Donald Trump or Trump supporters. Rather, I ask that all citizens at least try to evaluate issues as objectively as possible. (“Issues” replaces “facts” here because it seems that the electorate cannot agree on the validity—or lack thereof—of anything smacking of politics these days.)

I wish we could agree that corporate moguls—and politicians—do not live like you and I live. Their wealth and power separate them from us. And so, here is Sanders on the issues.

Let’s be clear. United Technologies is not going broke. Last year, it

It has also

  • received more than $50 million from the Export-Import Bank and
  • (received) very generous tax breaks.

In 2014, United Technologies

Last year, the company’s five highest-paid executives

The firm also

I agree wholeheartedly that keeping—or saving, if you prefer—over 1,000 Carrier jobs in Indiana is a good thing in and of itself. But at issue for me is the source of corporate tax incentives that convinced United Technologies not to move its Indianapolis plant to Mexico lock, stock, and barrel. Imagine how you might feel if you were an out-of-work or underemployed resident of Indiana, knowing that your state has committed subsidies and tax cuts to a corporation which has demonstrated its willingness to abandon Indiana for one, sole reason: to increase profits.

When, I ask myself, is enough enough? The answer is always the same: never.

*****

The illustration at the blog’s top corner is the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The blogger is a Vietnam Veteran, 1966-67. He is an author and past state chaplain for a major veterans organization. He welcomes comments on posts and encourages readers to subscribe to PTSDOutreach.com; two points: 1) it is free, 2) posts appear directly in your e-mail in-box.e is an author and past Chaplain